What is a card workout?

What is a card workout?

The deck of cards workout is a fast-paced, conditioning-style workout that uses a deck of cards to randomly serve up various exercises and rep counts. Each suit corresponds to a specific exercise and the card number indicates the number of reps you have to complete.

Is the deck of cards workout good?

But it’s important for athletes to be able to repeatedly perform a movement. And it’s a great way to get an extra fat-burning boost, if that’s your goal. A deck of cards workout is best done with one or more partners to split up the number of reps. If you do it on your own, you will perform 104 reps per exercise.

How long does Deck of Cards workout take?

5 to 10 minutes

How many calories does a deck of cards workout burn?

It takes a little over an hour, but you’ll burn 600 calories and you’ll never get bored.

How many pushups is a deck of cards?

You pull a card from the deck, and then do that many pushups. So if you pull a three, you do three pushups. Now this is pretty challenging since if you treat all numbered cards at face value (with an ace=1) and assign a value of 10 to each face card (jack, queen, king) then you’re looking at 340 pushups.

How do you do push ups with a deck of cards?

Playing Card Push-Up Workout Shuffle the cards and place the deck face down between you and your partner. Draw a card from the top of the deck. Perform the number of Push-Ups based on the number on the card. If it’s a face card or an ace, repeat the number of Push-Ups from the previous card.

How many push up and sit ups a day?

Move Up the Ranks Once it becomes easy to do 50 situps or pushups in small sets, try to increase your reps. If you can perform 50 pushups in a single set, try 75 or 100 every few days. Since situps recruit larger muscle groups, your capacity will improve more quickly.

How many pushups can a 13 year old do in a minute?

If you can do 100 pushups in a set, but no pull-ups, or sit-ups, then clearly there’s an issue. Having said that, at 13 you’d hitting a pretty optimal strength-weight ratio, so there’s not a whole lot of excuses for not being able to do at least 20–30 in a set. Probably like 20–25.

Andrew

Andrey is a coach, sports writer and editor. He is mainly involved in weightlifting. He also edits and writes articles for the IronSet blog where he shares his experiences. Andrey knows everything from warm-up to hard workout.